The important contribution that creative arts disciplines make to innovation, education and society is not always well understood. The DDCA advocates on behalf of its members to advance the creative arts in the higher education sector and, more broadly, for the role of the creative arts in society. 

 

Advocacy

 

DDCA responds to ERA 2018 journal review

At the request of the ARC, DDCA has reviewed and commented on the final journal list proposed by the ARC for inclusion in the 2018 ERA journal list.

We would like to take this opportunity to thank the 10 DDCA members who undertook the task of reviewing and providing input on behalf of their broad disciplinary areas.  These were then collated into the final response to the ARC.

DDCA’s role was only to review and comment on the journals that had been proposed via a consultation with universities and we were not able to include missing journals. However, the exercise revealed a significant number of current refereed journals missing from the ARC’s 2018 list. We have pointed out to the ARC that this risks giving an inaccurate picture of research activity in FOR 19 for the next ERA exercise. 

Although the list is now closed for 2018, given the seriousness and extent of the omissions,  we are hoping that the ARC will ask us to update the journal list in time for the next ERA exercise.


DDCA submission to the ARC Engagement and Impact Assessment Consultation (June 2016)

DDCA's submission responded to the invitation issued by the Australian Research Council for comments on its Consultation Paper.  The submission reinforced support for the principle that measures of research engagement and impact be sensitive to a range of research types and highlighted the lack of data related to creative arts research impact and engagement in current university data collection processes.

Details of the consultation process and paper are available at: http://www.arc.gov.au/nisa

Read The Submission


DDCA submission to Securing Australia’s Future- Research training system review by the Australian Council of Learned Academies ( ACOLA) (2015)

DDCA’s submission responded to the response format to the discussion paper released by ACOLA.  Key issues highlighted in DDCA’s submission included: the portfolio career and professional nature of research students in creative art disciplines; the gaps in current university graduate review and support systems and reforms needed to equitably encompass graduate training in creative arts disciplines.

Details of the consultation process and final report are available at: http://acola.org.au/index.php/projects/securing-australia-s-future/saf13-rts-review


DDCA submission to the Review of Research Policy and funding arrangements (2015)

DDCA’s submission responded to the response format to the discussion paper released by the Commonwealth Government.  Key issues raised in the DDCA submission included the contribution that creative arts research makes to the cultural industry, to innovation in industry more broadly and the need to support creative responses to improve innovation

The final report of the review of research policy and funding arrangements is available at: https://docs.education.gov.au/node/38976


Introduction of the Council of Deans and Directors of Creative Arts to DASSH. (2015)

DDCA President, Su Baker at the Australasian Council of Deans of Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities (DASSH) 2015 Conference.

Glenelg Pier Hotel, Adelaide. 23 September 2015

Media Coverage

 

Macarthur, S., Lochhead, J., & Shaw, J. (Eds.). (2016). Music's Immanent Future: The Deleuzian Turn in Music Studies. Routledge.

 

FitzSimons, T. (2015). ‘I've got to STOP writing this (adjective of choice) article and get onto my filmmaking’: documentary filmmaking as university research–some history and case studies. Studies in Australasian Cinema9(2), 122-139.

 

Kerrigan, S., Leahy, G., & Cohen, H. (2016). Still a burning issue: measuring screen production research. Studies in Australasian Cinema10(1), 79-96.

 

A&HHE Special Issue, Endnote by Julian Meyrick, December 2016

Despite the influence of the Strand Report (1998), which paved the way for consideration of select creative arts activities as ‘non-traditional research outputs’, the status, aims, methods and values of creative arts departments in Australia today vary widely.

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Why the University of Sydney art school sale is wrong by Su Baker. The Australian. 29 June 2016

"Why, when the rest of the world is unleashing the creative potential of young people to generate new cultures and industries and a better understanding of our world, is the University of Sydney selling off its highly esteemed art school to its major competitor?"

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DDCA in The Australian's High Wired 30 June 2016.

'The reinvigorated Australian Council of Deans and Directors of Creative Arts (DDCA) has produced it’s first online “space for views and news in the tertiary creative arts community. Our first edition focuses on the changing higher education landscape as we ask: Watt’s next for creative arts?” It’s called NiTRO and contributors include Monash’s Margaret Gardner, VCA’s Su Baker and ... yours truly.'

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AAWP Joins The DDCA

'The AAWP is delighted to announce that it will be joining the Australian Council of Deans and Directors of Creative Arts (DDCA) as an organisational member. AAWP President Lynda Hawryluk has contributed a short piece to the DDCA’s inaugural interactive component, NiTRO.'

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Studio Research Editorial, Issue #3. April 2015

'In March 2015, the Australian Council of Deans and Directors of Creative Arts (DDCA) conducted a three-day symposium in Melbourne entitled “The Outstanding Field: Artistic Research Emerging from the Academy”. This symposium[...] presented a showcase of twenty six exemplary Australian and New Zealand practice-led PhD projects from the past decade.'

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Measure for measure: the creative arts and the ‘impact agenda’  by Julian Meyrick. The Conversation. 13 October 2014

'There were some impressive speakers at the conference and the tone was optimistic without being blithe or over-emphatic.'

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Universities have key role in health and quality of arts by Jenny Wilson. The Australian 27 April 2016

'Artists need audiences to deliver their best, but audiences also deserve the best from the artists they come to see, and increased public attendance may encourage that.'

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Senior Arts Educators Lobby Pollies of All Persuasions. Arts Hub 13 May 2013

The newly formed Australian Council of Deans and Directors of Creative Arts (ACDDCA) is calling on federal politicians to urgently support increased funding to the tertiary arts sector.

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